Monday, April 22, 2019

Patreon for Indie Publishers

I really like the idea that writers should be compensated for all their effort. It’s hard work writing a book and many writers I know could use the money. Patreon caught my eye a while ago as a potential source of income for writers. It’s a website where you try and attract patrons, people who will support you in your efforts. They might contribute just to support your work, or maybe to get perks that you provide exclusively to your patrons.

I have not set up an account, so I haven’t tried it. But, from the articles I’ve linked below it appears it can be a lot of work. The first article I linked complains that the vast majority of the Patreon money goes to a small slice of Patreon users. Well, duh. I don’t see that as a flaw in the Patreon system, it’s just how the world works. If you put in the work and effort on Patreon, I suspect you can get some contributors. The other articles indicate a modest amount per month, but still better than nothing. It might be worth checking out!

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"Patreon now has 79,420 creators, according to Tom Boruta, a developer who tracks Patreon statistics under the name Graphtreon … Of those creators, only 1,393 — 2 percent — make the equivalent of federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour, or $1,160 a month, in October 2017. Worse, if we change it to $15 per hour, a minimum wage slowly being adopted by states, that’s only .8 percent of all creators. In this small network designed to save struggling creatives, the money has still concentrated at the top."
Read the entire article on TheOutline.com.

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"We currently have pledges of just over $200 per issue and we have been receiving payments. It may not sound like a lot (in particular compared to some of the YouTube-based projects earning thousands per episode), but it does boost our bottom line and every bit helps."
Read the entire article on Neil-Clarke.com.

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Neil followed up after a year with Patreon:
"After a year, I am still very pleased with Patreon and continue to recommend it to people."
Read Neil's follow up.

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"I’ve had several people ask me how Patreon’s been working out for me, so I decided I’d just write out a post for general consumption. I started my account back in July 2014, and as of this writing I have 35 Patrons and a total of $531 in monthly pledges, which is pretty damned good, all told … this means that every week my Patrons get an eclectic mix of work in progress shots, final projects, sneak peeks of blog posts that haven’t gone live, and whatever other fun things I decide to post … It’s a fairly steady amount of money each month … It’s a LOT of work." 
Read the entire article at TheGreenWolf.com.

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"With Patreon, I hear the same snide remarks that I’ve heard about Kickstarter and Indiegogo. Attempts at insulting writers for attempting to get paid through new inventive means. I don’t understand the hate. Maybe it mostly comes from the ultra-conservative crowd. People who just start vomiting into their own rectums at the idea of someone receiving monetary support without having to mine coal or dig ditches or whatever the hell us spoiled Millennials are supposed to do to prove our worth to society. Anything that disrupts the norm will always attract ignorance and hate. Never forget that. Most of the people who trash-talk Patreon don’t actually view writing as work. The concept of writing as labor doesn’t seem to exist for them. Writing is viewed as this hobby that doesn’t deserve compensation. You’ll hear the same argument from those who support for-the-love markets (publications that do not pay their writers): you should write just because you love it and expect nothing in return. Using art to help pay your bills will only destroy your creative input … You shouldn’t start a Patreon if you’re trying to get rich quick. It’s not going to happen. Patreons are slow burns that you develop over time. You will not be an overnight success story … Even $20 a month will help fill up your gas tank or support a severe breakfast taco addiction."
Read the entire article on LitReactor.com.

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